Saturday, August 31, 2013

23rd Light Dragoon at Talavera, Spain, 1809.


Just a quick post to put up my Single Model (Historical) entry for the NOVA Open painting competition tomorrow. When I decided to head down to the show, I cast around for a well-painted single model in my collection. As I soon realized, all of my historical stuff (the well-painted bits anyway) are multi-based, from the regiments to the artillery to the command. So I pulled out this guy. I've had him sitting on my table for over a year (closer to two) and I figured it was time to get him painted up.

He's a British Light Dragoon from Perry Miniatures, part of their 40mm Peninsular War range.

I hope you like him : )






Cheers
Dave

18 comments:

  1. Great looking light dragon, a vey nice pose and a wonderful paintjob...fantastic basing too!

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  2. He looks rather splendid, best of luck Sir.

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  3. Very nice! I wouldn't be surprised at all if he nets you a prize!

    Christopher

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  4. Beautiful work Dave. Can I ask your recipe for the basing? I'm putting together some British Peninsular Foot and Riflemen and I'd like to 'borrow' the colour of your basing.

    Best of luck for the comp

    Richard

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    1. PS the Perry's 40mm range is fantastic. I have a Rifleman officer waiting for some paint as a gift for my wife's grandfather.

      Rich

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    2. It is a fantastic range. As for the basing colors, I think I started with VMC Burnt Umber, drybrushed with VMC Beige Brown, drybrushed with GW Rakarth Flesh, then with VMC Pale Sand. The rocks got a few thin spot washes with various Secret Weapon washes. Hope that helps : )

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  5. Wonderful painting and basing on this Dave. It gets my vote, best of luck in the comp.
    Cheers,
    Pat.

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  6. Thanks to all for your positive comments. Unfortunately he didn't place, although I fear he may have been judged in the wrong category. Having said that, all the winners on the day were very well deserved. A great looking field all around.

    Cheers
    Dave

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  7. One thing I noticed was the dusting on the troopers lower pants yet the horse's lower extremities are fresh out of the bath. That might have doc'd you a few points...

    Don't get me wrong. You've done a wonderful job, but maybe next time add some of the mig pigments to match both rider and mount?

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    1. That might be the photos talking, the legs of the horse also have the same weathering powders used as on the rider's legs. In real life there's a definite difference between the satin look of the horse's coat and the matte, dusty fetlocks.

      Could there be more? Possibly, it's always a fine line between too little and too much, and I always seem to end up on either side. ; )

      However, there were a LOT of really good entries in the Historical categories, so I don't feel slighted in the least.

      Cheers
      Dave

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    2. Next year there will be even more. I plan to paint an exact copy of this miniature, and then present it in the historic category, as a copy of Dave's miniature. :)

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  8. Hi Dave, Your work is artistically beautiful. Thanks for providing us with your great blog and insights. If you don't mind me asking, what did you use for the plants on the base? Do you do any work to them after they come out of the package, and if so what do you do?

    Thanks!
    Josh

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    1. Hi Josh, thanks for the comments.

      The plants/grasses etc are all made by Silfor (sold by Scenic Express in the US). There are Late Summer and Autumn tufts of Buffalo grass, simply superglued on, as well as Silfor's excellent Assortment Meadow with flowers (for the flowering tufts). The grass tufts get a light drybrush of Vallejo Pale Sand once they're in place and dry.

      Hope that helps.

      Cheers
      Dave

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  9. Nice paint job. Best of luck in the comp.
    Good continuation

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